Advanced Search

Time of Reflection

Time of Reflection

Artist: Eddie Dominguez (American, born 1957)
Date: 2001
Medium: glazed ceramic and painted wood
Dimensions:
85 x 43 1/2 x 15 1/2 in. (215.9 x 110.5 x 39.4 cm)
Classification: Sculpture
Credit Line: Museum purchase with funds from the Herzstein Family Acquisition Endowment Fund, 2001
Keywords and Associated Locations:
Object number: 2001.28.1-.158
Description
Eddie Dominguez is a New Mexico-based ceramic artist who has spent much of his career examining functional household objects. The museum owns a work by him that resembles a clay aquarium, filled with fish and underwater plant life. But this is no ordinary representation of an aquarium: it disassembles into table settings of plates, bowls and mugs. The piece you see here can also, theoretically, disassemble into table settings, but it is meant to be a visual experience. Dominguez has always toyed with this balancing act of ceramics: its functional history and its struggle to be accepted as a high art form. That art-versus-craft conversation is inherent in his artistic practice. But what is of most interest with Eddie Dominguez's Time of Reflection in the context shown here is how the artist has made use of some of the basic tenets of Minimalism. Seriality, or repetition, is one of the trademarks of Minimalism. In Dominguez's sculpture, the same forms of plates, bowls, mugs, and pitchers are repeated over and over. This is true of any practicing potter, who can sit at the wheel and throw the same form with great precision and similarity. But then Dominguez has glazed each and every functional pot here in black and placed them-or better yet composed them-as a single unit. Without the variation of glazes, you tend to look less at the surface treatment of the individual pieces and more at their forms and see an overall balance in how they are displayed. The single color also references the school of monochrome painting, which is a close kin to Minimalism in this country. Lastly, you'll also notice how the shelving unit creates a grid-not unlike the other grids you'll see in this room. Only Dominguez's use of the grid seems to suggest that the grid, repetition, and the monochromatic are part of our daily life, much like a morning cup of coffee in a favorite clay mug.
Not on view