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Special Outfit for Trading Land with the U.S. Government for Whiskey with Gunpowder in it (from the series Paper Dolls for a Post Columbian World)

Special Outfit for Trading Land with the U.S. Government for Whiskey with Gunpowder in it (from the series Paper Dolls for a Post Columbian World)

Artist: Jaune Quick-To-See Smith (American, Salish-Kootenai, Métis-Cree, Shoshone, born 1940)
Date: 1991
Medium: xerographic print with watercolor and pencil
Dimensions:
Support: 17 x 11 in. (43.2 x 27.9 cm)
Classification: Photograph
Credit Line: Gift of Lucy R. Lippard, 1999
Keywords and Associated Locations:
Object number: 1999.15.301.6
Description
Jaune Quick-To-See Smith’s complete set of Paper Dolls for a Post Columbian World with Ensembles Contributed by US Government includes a doll for each member of the Plenty Horses family: Ken, Barbie and their son Bruce. This set of dolls was the artist’s ironic response to the 500th anniversary of the arrival of Christopher Columbus in the Americas. The use of xerographic copies, with hand color applied, allowed the artist to make multiple versions of the paper doll family for widespread distribution. The controversial 1992 celebration of the Columbus Quincentenary prompted many exhibitions, symposia and articles reevaluating the myth of discovery and the consequences of contact to the indigenous people and environment of the Americas.
Contemporary Native artists like Jaune Quick-To-See Smith look back on the history of negotiations between the U.S. government and indigenous people with a critical eye. In Smith’s work, the same kinds of blankets that once represented an ethnic group comes to stand as symbols of Native people’s troubled history with the U.S. government.
Not on view