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How the West is One

How the West is One

Artist: Will Wilson (American, Navajo, born 1969)
Date: 2012 (printed 2013)
Medium: pigment prints, diptych
Dimensions:
Image (a): 35 1/16 x 23 1/8 in. (89.1 x 58.7 cm)
Support (a): 36 x 25 3/16 in. (91.4 x 64 cm)
Mat (a): 40 x 30 in. (101.6 x 76.2 cm)
Image (b): 35 1/8 x 23 1/16 in. (89.2 x 58.6 cm)
Support (b): 36 x 25 1/8 in. (91.4 x 63.8 cm)
Mat (b): 40 x 30 in. (101.6 x 76.2 cm)
Classification: Photograph
Credit Line: Museum purchase with funds from FOCA+P and Bob Nurock, in honor of Dr. Joseph Traugott, 2013
Keywords and Associated Locations:
Object number: 2013.18ab
Description
This double self-portrait was originally made using a nineteenth-century photographic process in which light-sensitive material is poured onto a metal sheet before being exposed by the camera. The artist scanned the unique print that resulted and printed it as a larger image on paper. His use of the early process is a reference to photographer Edward Curtis and other European American artists whose photographs of Native Americans have permeated this country’s culture. By being “the Indian behind the camera” and photographing contemporary Native peoples, Wilson addresses the misconceptions and stereotypes that have resulted from a long history of portraiture by those with little knowledge or understanding of indigenous cultures.
Not on view